Resignation Anniversary

Yep! It's been a year already since I left advertising.

Do I miss it? No way. Heck no, hell no, shit no, fuck no, no, no, no, NO!

In honor of the one year celebration of which I have been partaking... Below is the letter I turned in when I did my final paperwork on October 19th, 2007 (names changed, of course):

To Whom It May Concern:

I would like to continue working for The Agency in a part-time capacity as I am needed, but I am compelled to address some issues even if it may mean I will not be brought back in to help out. I wish to address specific issues in my employment that may give insight into why I am leaving my full-time position.

1) Privileged information should be kept to MANAGEMENT ONLY. On many occasions, private information was shared with me about other employees including medical conditions and even the possible termination of co-workers (all is information I have kept to myself)… I appreciate the trust that has been placed on me by several managers sharing confidential information, but my concern is that co-workers have queried about my personal information that was only shared with management. For the sake of confidentiality - - the details of other employees should not have been or ever be shared with anyone, including me, ever.

2) When mistakes in the media department are made, The Boss does not believe someone’s sincerity until they are crying - often brought on during a round of yelling, cursing, and public humiliation. I am a strong willed person, and when I get close to my breaking point of yelling in retaliation – I switch suddenly to crying to keep myself from losing control of my anger. Besides crying myself several times, I have been witness to Ms. Red, Party Girl, RJ, and Supermodel crying under the same circumstances.

3) The only time I ever received a raise was when I tried to quit over 2 years ago. Later, I moved up to Media and was told that after 90 days I could expect to make just above $40K annually. At my 90 days I was switched back to hourly at the exact equivalent of my salary pay (I had been salary for over a year), and told I would receive a review after Christmas. After I had been upstairs for 6 months I asked both Blondie and The Boss if I could have a review, and I was told that someone would get around to it soon. That was March 15, 2007.

4) For all of my hard work and hours of overtime, there have been 3 distinct occasions since I moved into the Media Department that I have been treated so poorly that I wanted to quit.

*I* - The day of the company Holiday Party 2006, just before I reached my 90 days in Media - - I had not received any training regarding the newly restrictive Clear Channel policies, and when I canceled a schedule within the 2-week window (by 1 day) The Boss began screaming at me while I was sitting in Blondie’s office. I tried to remain calm, but when she began shaking her finger in my face I broke down crying. I tried to leave, but The Boss followed and continued yelling at me in front of the entire Media Department… After several minutes of being shouted at for my incompetence (while in front of my peers), I said I needed to leave. As I walked out the door, The Boss said, “Don’t let this keep you from coming to the party." I went to the party, but was horribly uncomfortable all night.

*II* - When The Agency got the Oldest Clients Imports stores back in February 2007 - - Blondie and I didn’t want to hold the previous agency's placed radio pre-books because budgets were changing. Our alternative plan was to cancel the pre-books, and then place as needed for 2 months so we could get a feel for the buying load and pattern. The Boss said, and I quote: “Employees like you are a dime a dozen. If you are unhappy and don’t want to do things The Agency way, I can find someone to replace you in a heartbeat.”

*III* - The night before I went on vacation to Washington D.C. in April 2007 - - I worked until 1:00 in the morning (my husband had left at 9PM to finish packing and walk our dog) and The Boss was driving me home… She told me she understood that I was probably burning out and that if I wanted to look for another job I didn’t need to worry about her finding my replacement. I evaluated my perceived worth at The Agency the entire time I was on vacation.

Looking back, The Boss told me said she was desperate to find someone for Media in August of 2006… and I knew KT was going to turn in her notice. I offered to come upstairs because I had placed media at my job in Arizona, but stated up front I would need training. Please know - I have great respect for The Boss's expansive knowledge of Media and her overall dedication to the company. I have seen her cancel personal travel plans and work until she can barely stand to make sure things are taken care of for the rest of the building. For my personality type - - I am far too passionate about the work I do, and had truly valued The Boss’s opinion so much that I lost my drive to make so many personal sacrifices after so many instances of being told I could be easily replaced (true or not – it hurt me to think I wasn’t a valued member of the team).

Looking to the future – The Agency could do so many great things if only everyone could come together and LISTEN. It saddens me that I have seen many great ideas shot down. People being hired fresh out of college can be built into The Agency’s future. Instead of honest consideration and regard for their fresh thinking – their ideas are disregarded and even mocked at times, and then these young people lose their desire to help, or try, and become employees who only work hard enough to keep their paycheck.

When I was hired to be a manager at Target Corp, I had to participate in an intensive 120-day management-training program. I traveled around the country to shadow top managers at top stores and learn from their knowledge and experiences. In order to be prepared to handle employee conflicts, lessen turnover, and keep morale high – they believe everything starts with their managers. There are 5 requirements to becoming a strong leader according to corporate philosophy. They are basic guidelines that seem elementary, but from large companies to small - - these things make for a better work environment for everyone and I hope they can be reviewed for The Agency:

*Give annual reviews annually. As a manager you cannot allow yourself to become too busy to reward loyal workers. While employees do come to expect a raise year after year, it gives them something they can count on and further drives their loyalty while helping them keep up with inflation. Also, you can use this time to praise and guide your employees, especially if you don’t get a chance through the rest of the year.

*Communicate. By keeping employees and co-workers in the loop, you build in a safe-guard of people who know what is going on, what is expected, what may be coming down the line, and what has happened. From simple updates to grand explanations - - the more you keep employees informed, the more they feel they are a part of a team and will work better together knowing what part they play.

*Be a calm mediator, not an angry dictator. Through history, people who work to resolve problems in an assertive and respectful manner are revered and remembered as great leaders. People who dominate without regard to human feelings are despised and remembered as adversaries to growth. Your employees will respect you more if you keep your cool in heated situations, and choose your words wisely (anyone can drop a 4-letter word in anger – only people in control can avoid it).

*Listen. Some of the best ideas come from employees who have a different point of view. If an idea is one that was tried in the past without success… consider it again (just because something didn’t work before doesn’t mean it can’t be fine-tuned). By simply listening honestly - you will help build up the confidence of your employees while discovering new ideas together.

*Focus on the bigger picture. Each and every employee is a functioning part of the company as a whole. If you keep focused on the future instead of dwelling on the minute details of the past, your team will thrive. Let go of mistakes and work together on solutions. Ultimately the steps you take will lead to success or failure… so stay focused, keep your team tasked, and always remember your goals.

I believed that with time, effort, and passion, I could be part of the long-term future of The Agency. I am very sad to be leaving the Oldest Client's team in particular… because I have built relationships with my stations representatives as well as a respectful rapport with the dealers. I think Mormon Boy has the drive and vision to handle the account once he digs his hands into the little details (the Devil is truly in the details on the Oldest Client's Radio Advertising). While I hope my honesty doesn’t affect my relationship with The Agency, I will understand if I do not get any calls to come in.

On the other hand, everyone is welcome to call me whenever an extra hand is needed… to assemble books, reconcile orders, help out in traffic if someone calls in sick, or anything else that comes to mind. I’d be happy to save searching with a staffing company when I am just a phone call away and already know many of the daily processes.

Sincere Regards,
The Conqueress

Please note - I was never called in (hehehe).


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